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Celebrating Australia Day on you gap year

For the people of the land Down Under, Australia Day marks the day that the first fleet of ships Captained by Arthur Phillip's sailed into Port Jackson in New South Wales in 1788.

Australia Day is a celebration of how far the country has come since then and It has also become a way of welcoming new arrivals to the country, with many people being awarded citizenship by the prime minister.

So, 'how do you celebrate this holiday?' you may wonder. Well, here are a few traditions that are commonplace should you want to live as the Aussies do.

Picnics

For the more chilled out celebratory, picnics is a common feature of the holiday, and, in fact, the nation generally. They even have a 'Picnic Day' in the Northern Territory during August. There are many lovely destinations that one can head to in the city you're in, like Kings Domain Gardens in Victoria which hosts a great array of wholesome events and activities.

When it comes to food many Australians take snacks like a layered picnic loaf, baguettes, salads, pastries and wash it down with a fruity ice tea.

Revellers making their way to the park for a picnic

Barbecues

Barbecues in Australia are of major culinary importance, like the roast dinner of Great Britain. As such, many a household will have a high-quality grill in their backyard. Should you be lucky enough to be invited over then expect some top hospitality and enough meat to shake a stick at! If you're winging it alone, the general consensus of an Australia Day barbecue is to shove as many types of chop, ribs, steaks, briskets, fish and of course shrimps onto the barbie as possible. In accordance with this, it's also customary to serve it up with some nice lagers, such as James Boag's Premium Lager or Victoria Bitter.

A classic barbecue setup

Triple J Hot 100

A countdown of the best songs of the year may seem to most people like nothing especially exciting, but among the younger members of the nation's folk, the Triple J Hot 100 is synonymous with Australia Day. Rather than a run through of the biggest selling tracks of the previous year, it is voted for by the general public on what they think was the best song of that period. Because of this, it is known as "the world's greatest music democracy" and there really is some left-field surprises.

The beauty of listening to the Hot 100 is that you can do it anywhere: at the beach, in the park or at a party. Many people play drinking games along with it and make bets as to who will win.

Sun, sea and the best tunes of the year. Does it get any better that this?

Fireworks

To top off a great day in the national spirit, the holiday generally reaches its climax with an all-out fireworks extravaganza. There are many places to see a good show, but Sydney Harbour is supposed to be one of the best locations. But that's not to say there aren't any other great places to enjoy some fireworks. Most bays like NewQuay Promenade Docklands in Melbourne will be capping off the day in style, too.

Fireworks over the city skyline

So to our Australian cousins, we wish you a beaut of a day.











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