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5 crazy things to do in Norway


With the brief appearance of summer we thought you may need some cool inspiration for your gap year planning.

BASE jump off Mt. Kjerag

To complete a BASE jump authentically one must jump from a building, antenna, span or earth, and there is surely nothing that constitutes the term ‘earth’ more than Kjerag, which is located in Lysefjord, South-Western Norway. With a jump-off point of 3,228 ft and a beautiful surrounding area of white granite rocks and a stunning lake in the backdrop, the area is a beautiful, serene location to commit an act of bold, daredevil behavior.

 

Snowkiting in Hardangervidda

As well as jumping off mountains, one can also ski or snowboard down them. In the latest addition to adrenaline sports, many have taken to ‘snowkiting’, as well as ‘skikiting’. The process basically involves a pair of skis/snowboard, appropriate, safe clothing and a kite (which resembles a parasail wing). Best of all, it is allegedly fairly easy to master and if you’re a real speed freak it is possible to reach speeds of 100mph.

The mountainous plateau of Hardangervidda is considered the best place to undertake the sport due to it previously playing host to the snowkiting World Cup and championship events, meaning it is in top quality. Additionally, the expansive views of the area are a pleasant mix of rich green vegetation and wildlife like large herds of reindeer.

 

Bungee Jumping in Vemock

Adrenaline junkies have been bungee jumping for years and years, so it’s understandable that people are always looking to experience one that goes that little bit further. Vemock in Tinn is a place that many adventurers seek to take the plunge. Whilst being encircled by natural beauty, it also is home to Norway’s highest fixed suspension bridge. At a distance of 84 metres, it isn’t any typical bungee jump, with Visit Norway describing it as: “very special and very tough because it is like jumping into a funnel.” We’re not a 100% sure what jumping into a funnel would be like, but it excites us greatly.

 

Ice Climbing in Rjukan

Ever wanted to clamber up a waterfall? Perhaps not, because it sounds pretty much impossible. In Rjukan, South Central Norway, one can actually climb up a naturally frozen water cascade. The people of the town live without sun during the latter parts of the year. Coupled with the constant freezing weather conditions, it makes the area ideal for the extreme act of ice climbing.

Because it is such a novelty, booking a turn can be very tricky. So it is best to book well in advance to avoid disappointment.

 

Snowscootering in Vierli

The Norwegians certainly make great use of their cold climate - especially when it comes to activities in the snow. Alongside some excellent places to ski and snowboard, snowscootering is something that the more daring traveler can hope to take part in when in the country.

In the Vieri ski resort it is possible to really get the best out of the vehicle, where one can make some powdery ground on alpine pists. It’s a venture that is considered hugely enjoyable as you can speed off into the the horizon, with only miles of snow and the shining sun as company.

 

 











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