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Pancakes from around the world

Kaiserschmarrn, from Austria

Kaiserschmarrn is a shredded pancake with all the same ingredients as your typical British pancakes except they bake the batter in butter, which, in my opinion, sounds even better! You can find this dish in Austria, Bavaria, Hungary, Slovenia and northern Croatia. Typically, you garnish this pancake with an array of nuts, cherries, plums, apple jam, caramelized raisins and slivered almonds.

 

Pannukakku, from Finland

Pannukakku actually translates directly to pancake, so even if it looks a little more pastry-like, this is actually what the Finnish mean when they talk of pancakes. Instead of cooking in a frying pan, this little treat is baked in an oven and is basically the baby of French toast, custard and crepes.

 

Uttapam, from India

Uttapam really nails the savoury pancake quite like nothing else. The preparation alone requires far more effort and skill than our standard pancake does. The batter is actually made up of different kinds of rice and lentils and then topped with tomatoes, onion, chillies, capsicum, coriander and even coconut, grated carrot and beetroot. All of which together creates an incredible explosion of flavours that you won’t forget for a long time.

 

Apam Balik, from Malaysia 

Apam balik is like a turnover pancake from Southeast Asia. The pancake itself is thick and super fluffy with delicious fillings inside including creamed corn and peanuts. However, it’s a very versatile dish and can also be made to satisfy savoury taste buds with cheeses and other toppings.

 

Cachapas, from Venezuela and Colombia 

Cachapas is the Spanish word for ‘crumpets’ and is traditionally made from either fresh corn dough or wrapped in dry corn leaves and boiled. As a general standard, Cachapas are eaten with queso de mano, a handmade cheese, like mozzarella, although as people get more elaborate with their creations, there has also been a move towards trying them with other kinds of cheese, cream or even jam.











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